Sylvia Berry has been a featured contributor in such publications as Early Music America, Keyboard Perspectives, and the Journal of the European Piano Teacher's Association: Netherlands & Belgium Edition.

The Final Frontier

Early Music America
Vol. 15, No. 3 (Fall 2009)

Early on in my historical performance life, when I was still basking in the period of post-conversion euphoria that many of us experience when we "switch" from modern to early instruments, I started to sense that something wasn't quite right.

The Virtual Haydn

Early Music America
Vol. 16, No. 2 (Summer 2010)

In anticipation of the 200th anniversary of the death of Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809), a number of early keyboard specialists embarked upon complete recordings of Haydn’s keyboard works, all but one of which was released before the Haydn Year 2009.

Performing the Score: An Appreciation 

Early Music America
Vol. 18, No. 4 (Winter 2012)

Performing the Score is the follow-up to pianist Malcolm Bilson's wonderful lecture-DVD Knowing the Score released by Cornell University in 2005 (reviewed in EMAg, Fall 2006, page 31).   

 

Haydn Recordings in the Bicentennial Year

Keyboard Perspectives: Yearbook of the Westfield Center for Historical Keyboard Studies
Vol. II, 2009

In anticipation of the 200th anniversary of the death of Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809), a number of early keyboard specialists embarked upon complete recordings of Haydn’s keyboard works, all but one of which was released before the Haydn Year 2009. 

Interview with Pianist Sylvia Berry

By Peter Burwasser
Fanfare
July/August 2014 (Vol. 37, No. 6)

Q: I must say that I enjoyed your CD immensely. Because of your wonderful playing, and the use of a period instrument, I felt as if I were hearing these pieces for the first time, which, in a way, I was. What led you to your interest in period keyboard playing? 

Remembering William Dowd (February 28, 1922 – November 25, 2008)

Westfield Center for Historical Keyboard Studies Newsletter
Vol. XXI, No. 3 (Spring 2009)

Depending on one’s worldview, it was either serendipity or fate that brought William Dowd and Frank Hubbard (1920–1976) together at Harvard in 1940. It was here that the boyhood friends saw their first harpsichord . . .